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Can California fight climate change and provide good jobs?

by Jeong Park, The Sacramento Bee


Highlights

  • Oil and gas jobs provide people with middle-class incomes and are one of the few sectors to provide good-paying jobs without needing a bachelors degree or from those who have a criminal record
  • Since the fossil fuels industry is one of the biggest employers in the Central Valley, many are afraid that clean energy mandates will leave their communities jobless
  • Clean energy jobs do not pay as well as fossil fuel jobs and the state must ensure that these jobs have good pay and benefits 
  • Carol Zabin, director of the Green Energy Program at UC Berkeley Labor Center, says the state should provide apprenticeship and training programs that guarantee jobs after the courses are completed
  • Zabin also recommends project labor agreements where clean energy projects rely on local labor
  • Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez highlights the importance of making sure there is an emphasis on job creation as the state moves away from fossil fuels:

“Jobs can’t be an afterthought to any climate change legislation.”


Fossil fuel divestment and the transition to 100% clean energy is critical to achieving The Climate Center’s goals under the Climate-Safe California Platform. The Climate Center’s guiding principles in achieving our goals include striving to close the climate gap and ensuring a just transition for workers.


Read More: https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article246092400.html

Clean energy jobs are coming. Here’s how to make sure they’re good jobs

by Sammy Roth, The Los Angeles Times


Highlights

  • UC Berkeley’s Center for Labor Research and Education released a new report titled “Putting California on the High Road: a Jobs and Actions Plan for 2030″
  • Carol Zabin, lead author of the report, emphasizes that many people are currently in the energy workforce and need to be trained in clean energy technology
  • Green jobs should be well paying, have good benefits, offer opportunities to people of color, and allow career advancement 
  • Before the COVID-19 pandemic, California had 537,000 clean energy workers, and that number is expected to rise due to the states clean energy target deadlines coming in closer
  • The report lacks details on ensuring a just transition of labor to fossil fuel industry workers but suggests further study is needed
  • A just transition will become more important in areas such as the Central Valley, where many oil industry jobs may be phased out in the coming years
  • Union support will be essential for adopting climate action policies according to Zabin:

“When unions feel like they see their future in a clean economy, and they really have evidence at hand…they tend to be supportive, because most of them are not climate deniers…But like all of us, union members who fear their basic livelihood is going to get lost, they call up their elected leaders and say, ‘Hey, your job is to protect us.’”


Fossil fuel divestment and the transition to 100% clean energy is critical to achieving The Climate Center’s goals under the Climate-Safe California Platform. The Climate Center’s guiding principles in achieving our goals include striving to close the climate gap and ensuring a just transition for workers.


Read More: https://www.latimes.com/environment/newsletter/2020-09-03/how-to-make-sure-clean-energy-jobs-are-good-jobs-boiling-point

Report: Five principles for equitably managing a phase-out of extraction

by Greg Muttitt, Oil Change International


Highlights

A new study in the journal Climate Policy has laid out steps to a sustainable and just energy transition away from fossil fuel extraction.

  • Wealthy countries such as Canada, the United States, and Norway are using funds to bail out their oil industries while less fortunate countries must make difficult financial decisions in response to the COVID-19 pandemic 
    • This shows the disparities of the worlds unsustainable and unjust energy transition
    • These wealthier countries must exceed global targets for emissions reductions
    • Poor countries will face a more difficult transition if their economy is based on fossil fuel extraction
  • The five principles of an early fossil fuel phase-out:
    1. Phase down global extraction at a pace consistent with limiting warming to 1.5°C.
      • Globally fossil fuels must be largely phased out by 2050
    2.  Enable a Just Transition for workers and communities.
      •  Training fossil fuel industry workers to transition into clean energy jobs and protecting communities who rely on fossil fuel industry income
    3. Curb extraction consistent with environmental justice.
      • Ending fossil fuel extraction should be prioritized in frontline communities experiencing inequitable amounts of pollution
    4. Reduce extraction fastest where the social costs of a transition are the least
      • Wealthier countries should phase out extraction fastest because they have the funds to transition faster than poorer countries 
      • Graphic from PriceOfOil.org

    5. Share transition costs fairly, according to the ability to bear those costs.

Fossil fuel divestment and the transition to 100% clean energy is critical to achieving The Climate Center’s goals under the Climate-Safe California Platform.


Read more: http://priceofoil.org/2020/06/01/countries-need-to-phase-out-fossil-fuels-heres-how-to-do-it-fairly/

Soccer and oil from Stand.LA by KPCC AirTalk

A clean, green, and just economic recovery

Take action today for a clean, green, and just economic recovery in California.

On April 28, The Climate Center and many of its partners sent a letter to the California legislature asking them to use federal stimulus funds to support proven programs that improve health and resilience, and create jobs for a climate-safe future.

We asked that they secure ongoing revenue streams to increase the impact and longevity of those dollars. And we recommended using bonds to help power California’s recovery.

Despite the terrible toll, COVID-19 is presenting a unique opportunity to transform our economy into a healthy, equitable, and resilient one. The California legislature can funnel stimulus dollars to reverse some of the damage already done by the pandemic, including 100,000 clean energy jobs lost in March alone.

Crucial investments we need now include accelerating the equitable phase-out of fossil fuel development, production, and use by replacing it with clean energy, increasing sequestration through healthy soils initiatives on agricultural and working lands, and investing in community resilience measures including community energy resilience to help us weather unavoidable climate impacts.

These investments create a pathway to a resilient economic recovery for California with a secure transition for everyone.

While the world appears to be at a standstill, emissions are still rising and the climate crisis means that we will likely face multiple disasters at the same time going forward.

The impacts of climate change will far outweigh those of COVID-19 and could abruptly collapse whole ecosystems, starting with tropical oceans in the next ten years. While the economic impacts from the pandemic are significant, extreme weather events alone are predicted to cost around $8 trillion globally per year by 2050 with untold direct and indirect human health impacts.

We have the chance right now to address the COVID-19 health crisis, the climate crisis, and the economic crisis by supporting a bold suite of policies to transition us to a vibrant, healthy, and climate-safe future for all.

Let’s ensure a clean, green, and just economic recovery. Take action today here. Together we can do it!

Endorse our Climate-Safe California campaign and support The Climate Center’s bold efforts today!