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California Community Choice agencies eye long duration batteries for energy storage


Highlights

  • A group of 11 small scale, local agencies called Community Choice Agencies (CCAs) have issued a request for information regarding long-duration battery storage that can hold power for at least 8 hours
  • The storage can be used to take in excess solar power from the day and shift its use for night time and morning energy needs
  • The request for storage comes after the California Public Utilities Commission adopted a 46 million metric ton (MMT) greenhouse gas emission target for the electric sector by 2030 early this year
  • The request for new storage will help create new economic opportunities and help fight climate change by lessening the state’s dependence on fossil fuels in our energy system

Community Choice Energy can be one of the most powerful ways to accelerate the transition from dirty fossil fuels to clean energy sources, and The Climate Center is working to spread it throughout California for a climate-safe future


Read More: https://www.utilitydive.com/news/california-ccas-solicit-info-on-long-duration-storage-with-possible-procur/579505/

Coal isn’t dying. It moved to Asia.

by Nathanael Johnson, Grist

In the United States, coal, that supervillain of fossil-fuels, is in a death spiral. But on a global scale, there’s no spiral, just an arrow pointing to Asia. Turns out coal isn’t dying; it’s moving.

A report out Tuesday from the International Energy Association reveals the extent to which coal has provided the power for Asian countries like Indonesia and Vietnam as their economic growth pulls millions out of poverty. The world burns 65 percent more coal today than it did in 2000, according to the IEA’s new report. Coal accounts for 40 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions.

Read more: https://grist.org/energy/coal-isnt-dying-its-moving-to-asia/

The power switch: tracking Britain’s record coal-free run

by Niko Kommenda, The Guardian

Britain is setting new records for going without coal-powered energy. In the latest milestone, it has gone for two weeks without using coal to generate electricity – the longest such period since 1882.

The coal-free fortnight comes just two years after the National Grid first ran without coal power for 24 hours.

Phasing out the heavily polluting fuel is a key step in the transition towards a net-zero carbon economy and essential to averting catastrophic climate change.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2019/may/25/the-power-switch-tracking-britains-record-coal-free-run

A centralized, top-down power grid is outdated. Time for a bottom-up redesign.

The below article outlines many of the challenges and opportunities of transforming the current power grid to one that works for the mass deployment of renewables.

The Climate Center’s Solar Sonoma County is working on this issue through our “Solar Plus” vision – a combination of solar, battery storage, electric vehicles, and all-electric homes and businesses for a carbon-free future.

The Center is also the lead partner on a team selected in May 2018 by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to participate in a collaborative research effort to explore new ways solar energy can improve the affordability, reliability, and resiliency of the nation’s electric grid. The Center was also selected by the California Energy Commission for a project to empower Community Choice agencies to use grid-connected local clean energy in commercial and industrial buildings.

Lastly, with support from the Adobe Foundation, the Center is compiling resources for distributed energy projects, programs, and best practices.


By David Roberts, Vox.com

The US power grid is, by some estimates, the largest machine in the world, a continent-spanning wonder of the modern age. And despite its occasional well-publicized failures, it is remarkably reliable, delivering energy to almost every American, almost every second of every day.

This is an especially remarkable accomplishment given that, until very recently, almost none of that power could be stored. It all has to be generated, sent over miles of wires, and delivered to end users at the exact second they need it, in a perfectly synchronized dance.

Given the millions of Americans, their billions of electrical devices, and the thousands of miles of electrical wires involved, well, it’s downright amazing.

Read more: https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/11/30/17868620/renewable-energy-power-grid-architecture