Posts

Wetlands

Rewild to mitigate the climate crisis, urge leading scientists

by Fiona Harvey, Grist


Highlights

  • According to a new study, restoration of Earth’s most degraded areas along with protections for areas still in good condition would help store an amount of carbon equivalent to half of all human-related greenhouse gas emissions since the industrial revolution
  • Restoration and protection would prevent 70% of anticipated species extinctions
  • Only 1% of funding fighting against the climate crisis goes to nature restoration even though nature-based solutions are among the cheapest way of sequestering carbon and protecting wildlife
  • Restoration and protection of peatlands, wetlands, and savannas will protect numerous species plus aid in carbon sequestration
  • Marine habitat restoration is also needed to protect marine ecosystems, food supplies, and sequestration efforts

Accelerating sequestration is critical to achieving drawdown greater than emissions by 2030 for a climate-safe future. We know today how to manage natural and agricultural lands for sequestration through proven carbon farming practices. The Climate Center applauds Governor Newsom’s recent Executive Order on protecting state lands and water resources. The Center encourages the Governor to adopt the Executive Order as written by us to accelerate negative emissions and carbon drawdown.


Read More: https://grist.org/climate/rewild-to-mitigate-the-climate-crisis-urge-leading-scientists/

Wetlands

Green infrastructure can be cheaper, more effective than dams

by Daniel Cusick, Scientific American


Highlights

  • A new report from the National Wildlife Federation and Allied World suggests that nature-based solutions to extreme weather events could save more money and result in less disaster-related damages compared to engineered projects such as dams, levees, and sea walls
  • The use of nature-based infrastructure, such as living shorelines and floodplain restoration can be supported with funding in upcoming water resource bills and economic recovery packages from the current COVID-19 pandemic, according to study co-author Jessie Ritter
  • The report includes nationwide case studies where nature-based solutions helped prevent or reduce impacts of climate-related events
    • In Texas, an abandoned golf course was converted into a wetland by the local water authority, protecting 150 homes from flooding during Hurricane Harvey in 2019 
  • Removing dams was found to be 60% less expensive than maintaining and repairing them over the three decades following the dismantling
  • Green infrastructure projects provide ecosystem services that improve water quality and protection for fish and wildlife habitats 

Implementing bold and equitable policies that will catalyze carbon sequestration and resilience through building healthy soils and restoring healthy habitats will be key to achieving drawdown greater than emissions (net-negative emissions) by 2030 for a climate-safe California.


Read More: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/green-infrastructure-can-be-cheaper-more-effective-than-dams/

Wetlands

Wetlands prevent hurricane damage. Economists now know how much

by Eric Roston, Bloomberg Green


Highlights:

According to a new study, wetland preservation will be increasingly important to protect Atlantic and Gulf Coast communities against hurricanes and cyclones.

  • The study evaluates how much wetlands are worth based on the cost of the damage caused by storms
  • One square kilometer of wetlands is worth almost $2 million a year in storm protection
  • Florida could have avoided $430 million in damages during Hurricane Irma if 2.8% of their wetlands were not lost 
  • Climate change is partially responsible for habitat loss in the Northeast of the US

Wetland preservation is also directly tied to carbon sequestration. When wetlands are lost, so are carbon sinks. The Climate Center advocates for funding for resilience measures in every community by 2025. 


Read more: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-03-02/wetlands-prevent-hurricane-damage-economists-now-know-how-much?sref=ABTRBDIh