Posts

World Economic Forum makes sustainable aviation fuel available for first time

by Alyssa Danigelis, Environmental Leader, January 20, 2020


Highlights:

  • The World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland is providing sustainable aviation fuel for its arriving business jets
  • Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) has an 80% smaller carbon footprint compared to normal aviation fuel
  • The use of the SAF is meant to demonstrate that the fuel is available, and will hopefully inspire more pilots to use it

Emissions from airline travel are rising fast. Offset your air travel here.


Read more: https://www.environmentalleader.com/2020/01/world-economic-forum-saf/

‘Worse than anyone expected’: Air travel emissions vastly outpace predictions

by Hiroko Tabuchi, NY Times

Greenhouse gas emissions from commercial air travel are growing at a faster clip than predicted in previous, already dire, projections, according to new research — putting pressure on airline regulators to take stronger action as they prepare for a summit next week.

The United Nations aviation body forecasts that airplane emissions of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas, will reach just over 900 million metric tons in 2018, and then triple by 2050.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/19/climate/air-travel-emissions.html

The promise of a carbon-free flight is on the horizon

by Peter Fairley, Spectrum

The aviation industry’s global trade group says electric airplanes are unlikely to be flying commercial routes before 2040. That pessimism from the International Air Transport Association is off by nearly two decades according to ZeroAvia, a fast-moving electric flight startup popping out of stealth mode today. For six months already, the Hollister, Calif.–based firm has been flying the world’s largest zero-emissions aircraft—the fuel cell-equipped prop-plane pictured above—and ZeroAvia vows that its powertrain design will be cutting both carbon and costs for regional flights in just 3 to 4 years.

“Right now we have an aircraft that’s six seats and 2 tons as an R&D demonstrator. Next year we’ll have a 20-seat aircraft and we’ll submit the design for [Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)] certification,” says Val Miftakhov, ZeroAvia’s founder and CEO. “That’s what drives the 2022, 2023 timeline. At that point, we’re expecting to have certification and put the system into commercial service,” Miftakhov predicts.

Read more: https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/aerospace/aviation/stealthy-startup-promises-cheap-carbonfree-flying-via-hydrogen

Aviation industry hears clamour for electric planes

by Jasper Jolly, The Guardian

Faced with growing calls for action on the climate crisis, aerospace companies gathering for the Paris air show next week are turning their thoughts to a future run on electricity rather than fossil fuels.

The scale of the challenge is considerable. The target for net zero carbon emissions by 2050, recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and embraced by the UK this week, coincides with the expectation that the number of flights will double in the next 20 years.

Aviation accounts for about 2% of total greenhouse gas emissions. But that share is expected to rise as demand grows in poorer countries to match developed nations such as the UK, where flying contributed 7% to overall greenhouse gas emissions in 2017.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/jun/15/climate-crisis-aviation-industry-hears-clamour-for-electric-planes?CMP=share_btn_link

Living with integrity: Fly? Offset? Avoid flying?

Woody’s recent blog on flying drew more views than any other piece of ours in years. This suggests that those who care about the climate but have places to go are wondering what to do.

Internally at The Climate Center, we talk frequently about flying and how to treat it with integrity. You may have noticed that we offer trips to Bhutan with carbon offsets. We advertise other trips abroad organized by an honored Business for Clean Energy member.

But we also exhort people to lighten their carbon footprints. As a transportation mode, flying is almost always the least climate-friendly way to go and the numbers are getting worse.

As long as flying is inexpensive and accessible, almost everyone who can afford it will continue to fly, even those who are hyper-aware of the climate consequences.

So what are we to do?

Those who travel can offset their carbon through an array of worthy options. The Center offers carbon offsets that allow you to minimize your impact by donating to us to help fund the work we are doing. Money from offsets and other support helps us advocate for a price on carbon.

Only when the cost of flying reflects its true cost to the planet will people pause before booking a flight.

Re-thinking personal travel plans: a no fly zone

On December 20, 2018, my wife and I watched an interview of fifteen year-old Greta Thunberg and her TED talk about the climate crisis. In the moments afterward, we realized that we could no longer justify flying.

The power of this young person’s voice is overwhelming. If you have not listened yet to Greta’s TED talk or her speech at the 2018 Climate Summit in Poland, we suggest you do. Greta’s way of communicating offers one of the most, if not the most, clear, compelling, and inspiring messages to all of us, especially we of the older generations, that we of the developed nations must start making sacrifices now to have any hope of enabling Greta’s generation to have a livable planet.

Grappling with how to respond to the climate crisis is an ongoing evolution, and we have taken some steps over the years, but it is rare that we make new big commitments. Committing to no more flying is a big one for us. But there was something special and super-compelling about Greta’s intensity, integrity, clarity, and consistency, and it affected us, and we are newly inspired to act.

One of the compelling things Greta says is that “what we do now, me and my generation can’t undo in the future.” She is right. Once airborne, although some carbon dioxide is continually absorbed in varying ways in the carbon cycle, much of it stays in the atmosphere for many decades to centuries. She says that “you are stealing our futures in front of our eyes” by continuing to emit carbon. The best option has always been and remains, not emitting carbon in the first place.

Greta also affirms that equity and climate justice are absolutely necessary to make action on climate work at the global scale, meaning that the developed countries must get down to zero emissions first so that poorer countries can build the infrastructure – roads (for EVs and bikes of course), schools, hospitals – that we already have. She says “today we use 100 million barrels of oil per day and there are no rules today to keep that oil in the ground, so we can’t save the world by playing by the rules and the rules have to change. Everything needs to change, and it has to start today.”

Regarding flying specifically, Greta puts it in black & white terms. If you fly, you are part of the problem, or you do the right thing and don’t fly. And she has convinced her once globe-trotting parents to swear off flying.

The commitment matters more if it is shared with others. Greta tweeted a recent study that found that leading by example by quitting flying has a huge impact. The bottom line? According to the study, 75% of people say if someone they know stays on the ground because of climate concerns it changes their view. Ergo, this blog.

Would a movement to reduce air travel matter? Ultimately I concluded that yes, it matters. When enough people make a similar commitment, to the point where a market force is applied, the global volume of air travel will be reduced. Reducing air traffic, which is currently expanding, would help significantly.

Knowing that I have a work trip to Denver in June 2019 from where I live in northern California, I quickly got onto Amtrak’s website to see what the possibilities are for train travel. We did have some experience with this since we took a cross-country trip by train in 2007 for a climate march in Washington DC. Train travel is not inexpensive, it takes a long time, and it is not carbon-free, but it is better than flying, and with enough planning, it appears to be workable. Given the fact that one can do some work on a train, taking the extra time for travel may not be a big problem. I recognize that that won’t necessarily work for everyone. We all have our own circumstances and limitations, so the point is, it can work if you put some careful planning into it.

But here is another point for all who care: All forms of powered travel have some emission, so the important question to ask if one really wants to reduce their footprint is: do I really need to take this trip?

Then there are emergencies. If faced with a life and death emergency, we would consider flying. But that is the only exception to our new self-imposed rule.

Here are some things to think about that can help reduce your travel emissions.

  • Consider not traveling. Every time you think about traveling by air, think: “Do I really need to?”
  • Consider all the alternatives, if you must travel. A 2008 Union of Concerned Scientists “Getting There Greener” guide offers some ideas.
  • Cancel the frequent flier program. Get rid of the things that would incentivize you to fly. Cancel any credit cards that give flier miles as rewards; switch to other forms of rewards.
  • Offset your carbon.

I’ll end with a couple of quotes from Greta. Greta says that we already possess what we need to solve the climate crisis, “we have all the facts, and we have the solutions, all we have to do is wake up and change.” She says “instead of looking for hope, look for action. Then, and only then, hope will come.” OK Greta, heard you, we are acting!