Oil sites in the Wilmington neighborhood of Los Angeles, by Greenpeace
Active oil and fossil fuel sites in and around living space in the Wilmington neighborhood of the Los Angeles area.

SB 47 protects public health

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Update September 23, 2021: Governor Newsom has signed this bill into law. We thank him!

There are more than more than 5,500 abandoned oil and gas wells in California, representing an immense threat to public health. The state faces a massive bill to clean up these wells left behind by oil companies that have gone under. The California Council on Science and Technology estimates that California is already liable for more than $500 million in cleanup costs. 

California law prohibited the California Geologic Energy Management Division (CalGEM) from spending more than $3 million in any one fiscal year for purposes related to hazardous wells, idle-deserted wells, hazardous facilities, and deserted facilities. 

Senate Bill 47 now indefinitely raises the cap on spending for these purposes to $5 million in any one fiscal year, protecting people in frontline communities who are exposed to hazardous materials in close proximity to these sites. It also creates jobs cleaning up abandoned oil and gas wells.
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